A Hoot and Holler For Owl Books

This week, I wanted to share a few of my favorite owl books with you.  No specific reason really other than the fact that I adore owls.  I hope that you enjoy the stories and illustrations of these delightful picture books. 

To extend your reading experience, you will find project ideas at the end of this blog. I drew the image for my blog and I thought that you might have fun making one too. The information provided describes how to draw an owl.

After you draw your first owl, try drawing another, but this time make it your own.  What would your owl look like?  Does it have big or small eyes? Is it wearing clothing? What about feathers?  I love art because all of the choices are yours.  If you draw several owls you could create  your own story, and that is surely a book that I would want to read. 

Little Owl's Night  by Divya Srinivasan.

It's evening in the forest and Little Owl wakes up from his day-long sleep to watch his friends enjoying the night. Hedgehog sniffs for mushrooms, Skunk nibbles at berries, Frog croaks, and Cricket sings. A full moon rises and Little Owl can't understand why anyone would want to miss it. Could the daytime be nearly as wonderful? Mama Owl begins to describe it to him, but as the sun comes up, Little Owl falls fast asleep. Putting a twist on the bedtime book, Little Owl's Night is sure to comfort any child with a curiosity about the night.

"I'm Not Sleepy!" by Jonathan Allen.

In this new installment in Jonathan Allen’s successful series, our ever-argumentative hero, Baby Owl, is definitely NOT ready for bedtime. Other animals stay awake during the day, so why shouldn’t he? He isn’t yawning, he’s thinking! Owls are very wise, and they spend a lot of time thinking, you know. So why does everyone seem to think Baby Owl is sleepy? He's not! He's really not! He's. . . fast asleep. Naïve, yet adorably plucky, Baby Owl has captured the hearts of young readers and their parents. Bedtime-resistant kids and weary adults everywhere will love this funny twist on a classic goodnight story.

Little Owl Lost  by Chris Haughton

What if a little owl fell from his nest? A reassuring story for the very young told with whimsy and simple, vibrant artwork. Uh-oh! Little Owl has fallen from his nest and landed with a whump on the ground. Now he is lost, and his mommy is nowhere to be seen! With the earnest help of his new friend Squirrel, Little Owl goes in search of animals that fit his description of Mommy Owl. But while some are big (like a bear) or have pointy ears (like a bunny) or prominent eyes (like a frog), none of them have all the features that make up his mommy. Where could she be? A cast of adorable forest critters in neon-bright hues will engage little readers right up to the story's comforting, gently wry conclusion.

Wow! Said The Owl by  Tim Hopgood

Here's the story of a curious little owl determined to see what the world looks like during the day. And what does she discover? A wow-worthy symphony of colors--from red butterflies to orange flowers, from white clouds to green leaves. This boisterous and bright book is the perfect read-aloud to savor with curious little owls everywhere who are exploring the world of colors for the first time.

Berkeley's Barn Owl Dance by Tera Johnson 

This is a lyrical and reassuring story about growing up and leaving the barn to dance on one's own. At the biggest barn owl dance of the year, the Leave the Nest Fall Fest, keen dancer Berkeley shines as usual. Next moonrise, however, she and her fellow fledglings Bo and Bree must leave home. Though Berkeley is frightened, the winking, smiling, laughing moon lights her way. After thousands of silent wing beats, she finds a new audience, and Flippity, Tappity, Clap Clap Clap, Berkeley's new barn dance begins. Berkeley's Barn Owl Dance ushers children into an unseen animal world, while the young owl's journey will help them prepare to spread their wings and fly on their own.

The Littlest Owl by Caroline Pitcher 

Deep inside a willow tree, three newly hatched owlets curiously examine the fourth, quiet egg. Is there an owl in there, they wonder. When at last the fourth owlet struggles free, he doesn't look much like the others. Dumpy, small, and downy white, he is left behind while his siblings learn to fly. No matter how hard he tries, he can't quite do it. "I will," he says. "Just you wait and see!" Will the littlest owl ever grow big and strong enough to fly from the tree? From the illustrator of five Book Sense Children's Picks comes the perfect story for any child who is a little nervous about venturing too far from home.

Owl Babies by Martin Waddell 

The bay owls came out of their house, and they sat on the tree and waited. A big branch for Sarah, a small branch for Percy, and an old piece of ivy for Bill. When three baby owls awake one night to find their mother gone, they can't help but wonder where she is. Stunning illustrations from unique and striking perspectives capture the owls as they worry about their mother: What is she doing? When will she be back? What scary things move all around them? Not surprisingly, a joyous flapping and dancing and bouncing greets her return, lending a celebratory tone to the ending of this comforting tale. Never has the plight of young ones who miss their mother been so simply told or so beautifully rendered.

Owl Moon  by Jane Yolen

On a winter's night under a full moon, a father and daughter trek into the woods to see the Great Horned Owl. This timeless and beautiful classic was the winner of the 1988 Caldecott Medal.

Good Night, Owl! by Pat Hutchins

How was Owl to sleep, with the bees buzzing, the crows creaking, the starlings chittering, the jays screaming -- and all the other inhabitants of the hollow tree pecking, calling or crunching? Owl tried to sleep, but it was impossible. Pat Hutchins has written a bedtime story with a switch; a surprise ending that will send the youngest child off to sleep laughing.

Project Ideas

 

How to Draw An Owl

Woodland Animals by Patricia Walsh 

Instructions and illustrations demonstrate how to draw various wildlife from a North American forest habitat, including the bear, owl, and skunk.